Investing in Parasite Resistance

A recent silent bid sale of USDA ARS Katahdin sheep indicates the importance of parasite resistance to buyers. Ninety-eight ewes and rams were offered for sale: 17 ram lambs, 12 mature rams, 24 ewe lambs, and 45 mature ewes. They were purchased by 13 buyers from 7 states. A sale catalog was distributed to the public by mail, email, or online. It described the sheep by age, sex, recent body weight, scrapie genotype, hoof color, and National Sheep Improvement Program (NSIP) estimated breeding values (EBVs). The EBVs included traits on parasite resistance, growth, and maternal (or reproductive). The traits were defined and additional information was provided, if inquiries were received. Potenti

FAMACHA© for Spanish Speakers (?)

The University of Rhode Island and its partners are seeking input as to whether there is an audience that would benefit from a SPANISH LANGUAGE version of its online FAMACHA© certification program. Go to the following link and take the short online survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/URIspanishsurvey. Your input is appreciated. The online FAMACHA© training program includes videos, fact sheets, and a 4-step process for FAMACHA© certification. The program was launched in March of 2016 and is housed at the following web site: https://web.uri.edu/sheepngoat/

BCS is Better Indicator of FEC

Three commercial sheep farms in a hot, tropical climate ( Yucatán peninsula, Mexico) were used to compare body condition score (BCS) ≤ 2 and FAMACHA© score ≥4 or ≥ 3 as criteria to identify ewes with FEC ≥750 epg and to confirm whether that FEC threshold allowed maintaining a large proportion of animals with no anthelmintic treatment. BCS and FAMACHA© scores were determined monthly. Fecal samples were collected from ewes (hair sheep) showing FAMACHA© scores ≥4, BCS ≤2, or both. All sampled ewes with FEC were treated with an anthelmintic. Choice of drug was dependent upon prior efficacy. BCS ≤ 2 was determined to be the best criteria for finding ewes with FEC ≥ 750 epg, with only 1.1% false

New Sericea Lespedeza Fact Sheet

Another fact sheet in the Best Management Practices to Control Internal Parasites in Small Ruminants series has been published (#5). Sericea Lespedeza was written by Drs. Thomas Terrill and Niki Whitley from Fort Valley State University (Georgia). All of the Best Management Practices fact sheets will be written and reviewed by members of the American Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control. Each review team will include a veterinarian. Most of the fact sheets will be published in 2018. Once complete, the fact sheet series will serve as a invaluable resource for producers and educators alike. Download Sericea Lespedeza Fact Sheet Go to the Best Management Practices Page

Resistance in an Institutional Herd

Four anthelmintics were tested for resistance in an institutional meat goat herd. Meat goat does at Tennessee State University were administered one of four anthelmintics orally [ivermectin (n=18), moxidectin (n=18), levamisole (n=17), or albendazole (n=19) or water (n=18)]. Fecal samples were collected pre-treatment and 12 days post-treatment. Fecal egg count reductions were calculated using three equations. Sire breed affected pre-treatment FEC, but not post-treatment FEC. Pre-treatment FEC did not differ by group. However, post-treatment FEC varied by group. FEC reductions were determined using three equations. A FEC reduction falling below 80 or 90 percent, depending upon equation, deter

Parasite Biology Impacts Control

The 4th fact sheet in the Best Management Practices to Control Internal Parasites in Small Ruminants series has been published. Parasite Biology Impacts Control was written by Dr. Anne Zajac, Professor of Parasitology at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine. All of the Best Management Practices fact sheets will be written and reviewed by members of the American Consortium for Small Ruminant Parasite Control. Each review team will include a veterinarian parasitologist. Most of the fact sheets will be published in 2018. Once complete, the fact sheet series will serve as a invaluable resource for producers and educators alike. Download Parasite Biology Impacts Contro

Field Evaluation of BioWorma®

BioWorma® is a feed supplement containing spores of Duddingtonia flagrans, a naturally-occurring, nematode-trapping fungus. It was developed by an animal health company in Australia and has been registered for use in Australia, New Zealand, and the United States. A recent article in the Journal of Veterinary Parasitology reports on the field evaluation of BioWorma® for the reduction of worm burdens in horses, cattle, and goats. Overall, the studies with BioWorma® reported show substantial and statistically-significant reductions in the emergence of infective nematode larvae from the feces of horses, cattle and goats. It is suggested that use of BioWorma® in these host species would, therefor

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Sericea lespedeza has been shown to reduce barber pole worm infections in small ruminants.