JEAN-MARIE "JM" LUGINBUHL, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus and Extension Specialist

 

(919) 515-8743
jean-marie_luginbuhl@ncsu.edu

Campus Box 7620
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695

 

Dr. Jean-Marie “JM” Luginbuhl, Professor Emeritus of Crop Science and Animal Science at North Carolina State University, led the Meat Goat and Forage Systems Research and Extension Program from October 1995 until June 2016, at which date he retired from the University. In that position, Dr. Luginbuhl was responsible for conducting research with meat goats and guiding the development of the North Carolina meat goat industry. His research program emphasis and goals included developing sustainable forage and browse-based feeding systems for meat goats, using goats as bio-agents to control invasive herbaceous weeds and woody vegetation in pastures, forest land and other areas when grazing alone or in combination with cattle, evaluating the browse potential of fodder tree species in silvopastoral systems for meat goats, and exploring non-pharmaceutical approaches to treating meat goats with traditional anthelmintics.

 

His extension program provided statewide leadership in the development of the expanding meat goat industry through training, technology transfer and educational programs designed for cooperative extension agents, farmers and agribusiness professionals. In the past, Dr. Luginbuhl worked with small farmers in the Andes of Peru. His other international experiences included Costa Rica, Honduras, Mexico, Spain, Morocco, Indonesia, Switzerland, Uruguay and Venezuela. Dr. Luginbuhl grew up on an integrated livestock-crop farm in a small rural community located near the city of Neuchâtel in the French part of Switzerland, and he speaks English, French, and Spanish fluently.

 

Dr. Luginbuhl was elected to the Board of Directors of the International Goat Association in 2008 and has been assuming the responsibility of Secretary-Treasurer since 2012.

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Hair sheep tend to be more resistant to gastro-intestinal parasites than wooled sheep or goats.